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Archive for the ‘Best Practices’ Category

“The important thing is not so much that every child should be taught, as that every child should be given the wish to learn. ”

by John Lubbock

Some quick thoughts about learning and online professional development:

  • Everyone can learn
  • Not everyone learns in the same way
  • Learning is a life-long process
  • I hope to inspire my students to want to learn
  • As a teacher, I should help my students learn how to learn
  • I need to model learning for my students
  • I need to show my students purpose
  • I can learn from my students, too
  • I hope to establish an environment of trust and safety in our classroom
  • Learning has changed with innovation. As educators we need to not only acknowledge this, but embrace it. Our students have!
  • Professional Development has also changed with innovation
  • Online professional development has allowed me to stretch beyond my own community and learn from so many other around the world
  • Online PD allows me to see many more perspectives than just those I see around me
  • Online PD has motivated me so much more than I thought possible!

The long-term challenge: In what ways will I ensure that my beliefs about how students learn are reflected in the classroom?

One step towards this goal is reflecting in my blog and another is participating in the online community for this challenge. The blog provides a place for me to reflect on my goals and review them as necessary. The online community provides a place for me to collaborate, share and reflect with others on the same journey.  While the connection to the classroom may not be blatant, it is still there. The connection is me.  The classroom, the blog, the community – I am a part of all of these things and all of these things are tools to be used to keep the focus when the educational demands become overwhelming.

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“You cannot force commitment, what you can do…You nudge a little here, inspire a little there, and provide a role model.  Your primary influence is the environment you create.”

by Peter Senge, suggested by John Evans

And so it begins… What? The 30-Day Challenge. It’s a personal challenge with an end goal of better engaging us with our students. The link to the challenge, should you choose to be curious is : Teacher Boot Camp – 30 Goals 2011 .  Those participating will use various media to reflect and support each other with and through various goals. Today’s goal:  Be a Beam.

Shelly Terrell, the foundation for this challenge, describes a beam as a strong, hidden structure that offers support.  She tells us that every day we have the opportunity to approach students as a support or as a wall.  What do we choose? What do I choose?

It’s my hope that I choose every day to be a support to my students. Some days are likely more successful than others.  Do I, however, extend that to my colleagues as well?  It’s easy to do that with the various social media that I participate (twitter, Facebook), because one can choose like-minded professionals to follow/friend.  Colleagues aren’t always those people.  I am hesitant to even say that, because comments have already been misinterpreted and misrepresented from my own Facebook page and spread through areas of my building.  (Really, my FB page is not all that exciting or dramatic – someone, for some reason just found it so.)

With that said, my goal today (and the next 30 days) will be to become that unseen beam for those people with whom I work.  Keep reading, I’ll post at the end of the challenge what I’ve tried.  Will I notice any difference in my colleagues?  It doesn’t matter. I hope I’ll be setting the foundation for better, improved collaboration and collegiality.

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Beginning this blog is the beginning of a journey. It is about a walk down the road of Education: where it is today and where it is leading all of us.  While I am leading this journey, I invite you, the reader, to join me. What are your thoughts? What are your questions? Am I entirely off base?  What advice to you have to share?

Personally, I sometimes feel bombarded by everything we as educators are expected to do in our schools: 21st century skills, differentiation, multiple intelligences, PLCs, RtI, common assessments, 504s, IEPs, ILPs, and more. And yes, we are also expected to be experts in our field and guide our students in that area.

On the other hand, I see all the benefits that these trends (if you can forgive the term) have to improving student learning. It’s all about what’s best for students and these “trends” have that motivation at heart.

As I try to incorporate all that is expected of me in a manner that speaks to best practices and not trends for the sake of trends, I plan to share my experiences and research with you, the reader.

Let’s see where we can go together!

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