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Archive for the ‘Performance’ Category

Rewards and punishments, carrots and sticks. We’ve all used these before, to varying degrees. Honestly, I hadn’t yet thought of them as being part of a “Motivation 2.0” world. Actually, I hadn’t thought of motivation as being demonstrated by various stages in history. There are many things that motivate us, I’m still pondering if these three stages are an over-simplification or not. What I can concur with, is that schools are generally in a Motivation 2.0 stage.

We want our students to be using higher order thinking skills. We have Bloom’s Taxonomy (I confess to attaching it to my lesson plan book every year). We have inquiry-based teaching/lessons/methodology. We know we want to reach a different level of thinking and achievement with our students. The question remains – how do we motivate them?

We motivate with grades, class rank, AP test scores and college credit, pizza or ice cream parties, candy, free homework passes, and so much more. We do dangle the carrots. Why do we do this? We were taught that way, those are the examples we’ve seen, the students respond to this and other similar responses. It’s easier to fall back on “tradition” (long-term effectiveness not in question) than to try and harness that biological drive towards motivation. We appreciate those students who have it, are very thankful to have them in class. But, have we tried to foster this – consciously? Or, do we pat ourselves on the back when it does happen?

Interview with Dan Pink: http://www.publicschoolinsights.org/carrots-and-sticks-are-so-last-century-conversation-author-dan-pink

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Performance pay. There’s an idea. Some school districts are using it. It’s another carrot to dangle in front of us to “motivate” us to work harder with our students. It’s a reward before the measurement. Something to work towards. Something new. In difficult economic times, many of us will jump at the hope of an increase in pay (especially when we haven’t had a raise and aren’t getting one).

Measurement. That’s where the questions here lie. How is this determined? What tools are being used? If we use state standardized testing, what about those subjects areas or grade levels that are not tested? One hates to hear the term favoritism, but can that happen? It does in the business world. Would this be used as a punishment as well? It can in the business world as well.

As much as many don’t want to publicly admit, there is a business side to education. The difference is that most educators are not business people. Most of us drawn to education are drawn for reasons besides the pay. Dan Pink said that “educators understand the differences between intrinsic motivation and extrinsic motivation better than almost anyone in American society.” I think there’s truth in that statement. Our reward is different. While we would definitely appreciate a better pay scale (as in many other countries around the world), I think we are the students who had that motivation to learn from the start.

I like something else that Dan Pink said, “Pay people enough so that they are not focused on money, but they are focused on doing their job well.”

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